America's Heartland Begins Third Season

First episode of PBS show features young Kansas farmer.

Osborne farmer Andrew Sigle is profiled on the first episode of the third season of America's Heartland, the weekly public television series that celebrates the contributions of America's farmers and ranchers.

Sigle's experience of being a young farmer wishing to return to the family farm will be on the Topeka Public Broadcasting System, KTWU, at 11 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 27. Or, click on the following link:
www.americasheartland.org/video/301_3_keeping_the_faith.htm.  

The third season of America's Heartland features 22 new half-hour segments will be featured in the magazine-style program this year. By the middle of this season, America's Heartland will have profiled unforgettable people, places and products of U.S. agriculture in all 50 states.

In Kansas, America's Heartland airs on KTWU each Sunday morning, plus stations in Wichita, Bunker Hill, Dodge City and Lakin at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday.

The program is made possible with funding from the series' two flagship supporters – Monsanto Company and the American Farm Bureau Federation.

The series also receives support from the American Soybean Association, National Corn Growers Association, National Cotton Council, United Soybean Board, the National FFA Organization, the U.S. Grains Council and National Association of Wheat Growers.

Other Season 3 segments include stories about five members of a hard-working North Dakota ranch family located in a remote corner of the state;a Las Vegas casino buffet operation that illustrates the farm-to-consumer connection on a very large scale and an Anchorage, Alaska innovator who figures out something profitable to do with the scraps from the state's salmon industry.

Produced by KVIE, the public television affiliate in Sacramento, America's Heartland is available on many PBS stations across the U.S. and on RFD-TV, and each story is streamed to the program website, www.americasheartland.org. Last year, the show reached over one million consumers.

TAGS: Soybean
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