Best practices help slow down resistant weed development

Best practices help slow down resistant weed development

Weed Science of America offers suggestions for best practices, spells out difference between resistance and tolerance

As spring planting time gets into full swing, there are few topics weighing more heavily on the minds of farmers than the growing problem of weeds that are resistant to herbicides. For Kansas, the two biggest problems are glyphosate resistant Kochia and Palmer Amaranth.

The Weed Science Society of America offers several suggestions on best practices for avoiding the development of weed resistance:

1. Change the modes of action of different chemistries, rotating your chemistry just as you do your crops;

2. Make sure the timing is right, use pre-emerge herbicides to start clean. Stay clean in the growing season and go back to fall applications to control kochia before it goes to seed;


RESISTANT KOCHIA: The Weed Science Society of America advises that best management practices include prevent resistant weeds from flowering or producing seed.

Understanding the Profit Siphon in your Field
It's a giant amongst weeds. For that matter, it's a giant amongst men. And wherever it goes, if it gets a head start, it will leave you hoping Superman will show up and wipe it out. Download our free report: Palmar Amaranth: Understanding the profit siphon in your field


3. Make timely post-emergence application, and be sure that you are getting the coverage and using the correct adjutants;

4. Practice field sanitation by mowing field borders to reduce the seedbank.

5. Keep in mind sanitation may require a community effort; get your neighbors on board;

6. If you have some escapes where you see this population, spend some time, investigate it and find something to take them out before they go to seed; it may be worth it to hire high school kids to go out with a hoe and chop down those escapes and prevent them from multiplying.

The WSSA also offers advice on the difference between herbicide resistance and herbicide tolerance as defined by the Herbicide Resistant Plants Committee and approved by the WSSA Board of Directors.

Those definitions are:

Herbicide resistance: “Herbicide resistance is the inherited ability of a plant to survive and reproduce following exposure to a dose of herbicide normally lethal to the wild type. In a plant, resistance may be naturally occurring or induced by such techniques as genetic engineering or selection of variants produced by tissue culture or mutagenesis.”

Herbicide tolerance: “Herbicide tolerance is the inherent ability of a species to survive and reproduce after herbicide treatment. This implies that there was no selection or genetic manipulation to make the plant tolerant; it is naturally tolerant.”

The Weed Science Society of America supports research, education, and extension efforts in all facets of herbicide resistance, including characterizing new cases of resistance, discovering the mechanisms and modes of inheritance of resistance, and identifying best management practices for preventing, delaying or managing herbicide resistance in weeds.

Watch for more on this topic in your May edition of  Kansas Farmer.

Source: Weed Science Society of America


Understanding the Profit Siphon in your Field
It's a giant amongst weeds. For that matter, it's a giant amongst men. And wherever it goes, if it gets a head start, it will leave you hoping Superman will show up and wipe it out. Download our free report: Palmar Amaranth: Understanding the profit siphon in your field


TAGS: USDA
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