'Bug' Collections Popular with Fairgoers

'Bug' Collections Popular with Fairgoers

More than 100 4-H entomology projects on display through Sunday in 4-H Centennial Hall.

One of the most popular 4-H events of the Kansas State Fair, the Kansas 4-H insect project collections, features more than 100 entomology projects that will be on display through Sunday.

The insect collections are perennial favorites with Kansas State Fairgoers. Visitors to 4-H Centennial Hall at the north end of the Fairgrounds, often stop to ask where boxes displaying insects commonly found in Kansas are displayed.

"The displays are appealing for several reasons," said Phil Sloderbeck, K-State Research and Extension entomologist and 4-H entomology project judge at the Kansas State Fair.

"Visitors often marvel at all of the different colors and shapes of the insects; some also remark that they are able to identify a previously unknown bug that appeared in the garden or around a porch light this summer," Sloderbeck said.

The 4-H Entomology Project is educational for participants as well, said Sloderbeck, who noted that the project teaches appreciation for the different species and groups of insects that range from flies and moths to tiny leafhoppers and beautiful butterflies.

The project also helps youth develop an appreciation for the environment and the role of various insects, patience in searching for specimens, and respect in preserving and mounting the specimens, the entomologist said.

More than 100 entomology project collections have qualified for exhibit at the Kansas State Fair this year, and will be on display in 4-H Centennial Hall through Sept. 18.

More information on educational 4-H projects and opportunities is available at K-State Research and Extension offices throughout the state and online: www.Kansas4-H.org.

K-State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well-being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K-State campus in Manhattan.

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