Odde Named Leader of KSU's Animal Science Department

North Dakota professor has K-State ties.

Kansas State University has named Ken Odde head of its Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. He will take on his new duties Feb. 26.

Odde has been a professor and director of North Dakota State University's Beef Systems Center of Excellence since June 2005. Prior to that, he served as head of NDSU's Department of Animal and Range Sciences.

Ken Odde

Odde also has been a manager of cow-calf technical services at Pfizer Animal Health and worked as a senior veterinarian with the Livestock Technical Services division of SmithKline Beecham-Pfizer Animal Health.

Prior to those positions he was on faculty at Colorado State University for 11 years (1983-1994) in a teaching and research position specializing in beef cattle reproduction.

"I'm excited about the opportunity to join the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and KSU. My wife, Arlene, and I are enthused about returning to Manhattan," says Odde, who earned a DVM degree from K-State's College of Veterinary Medicine in 1982 and a Ph.D. in Reproductive Physiology at K-State in 1983.

He also earned a master's degree in reproductive physiology from K-State in 1978 and a bachelor's degree in animal science from South Dakota State University in 1973.

"Livestock production is one of the most important industries we have in Kansas, and we're pleased that Dr. Odde has agreed to join us as we work to stay on the cutting edge of new developments in animal husbandry and in food safety and security. As head of animal sciences and industry, he'll be leading the department with the largest number of undergraduates in the college," says K-State College of Agriculture Dean Fred Cholick.

Ken and Arlene, his wife of 34 years, have three grown children and a grandchild.

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