The Buzz

Wheat harvest moves to Kansas.

The 2007 wheat harvest is well underway in Kansas. Yields range from disappointing to surprising; given the obstacles this year's crop has had to overcome.

  • Allan Fritz calls this year's hard red winter wheat harvest the "Incredible Shrinking Wheat Crop." That's because what looked to be a fantastic crop until the Easter Weekend freeze, came back from the freeze to look pretty good. However, in the last month, drought, insects and diseases have taken their toll. Fritz is the wheat breeder for Kansas State University…
  • Expectations for this crop ranged from 360 million to 390 million bushels 6 weeks ago. Based on observations in the field and conversations with farmers around the state, I expect the actual total to not eclipse 325 million bushels…
  • The Southern Plains Co-op in Greensburg, heavily damaged by the May 4 tornado, is ready to take wheat. Cooperative manager Danny McLarty Gruber told me a few weeks ago, as crews were working non-stop to ready the elevator for harvest, that "this is a farming community. We've been here for a long time and we'll be here for a long time to come."…
  • Incidentally, nearly $60,000 in livestock fencing supplies have been donated to victims of the May 4 tornado by members of the Livestock Marketing Association, Kansas Livestock Association and Texas Cattle Feeders Association, area businesses and numerous individuals…
  • The donations include more than 5,000 steel and hedge fence posts and 360 rolls of wire. Volunteers are being sought for fence-building; call (620) 659-2188…
  • David Pope, chief engineer of the Kansas Division of Water Resources, has resigned his post to take a leadership position with the Missouri River Association of States and Tribes…
  • Pope has been Kansas' "water czar" since 1983 and has presided over several contentious issues, including the lawsuit between Kansas and Colorado over streamflow from the Arkansas River and negotiations with Nebraska over the Republican River…

    Pope's last day is June 18…
  • Harvey County could become home to a 40-million gallon ethanol plant in 2009, according to a recent article in the Wichita Eagle. Emerald City Ethanol showed plans for the $150 million plant, to be located southwest of Newton, at a Harvey County Commission meeting last week…
  • The plant would be built near the old Harvey County landfill and would use effluent from the City of Newton's sewage treatment plant to offset daily water demand of 300,000 gallons. Initially, the plant will use grain sorghum as a feedstock, but would evolve into a prototype for cellulosic and other types of ethanol production…
  • Ethanol experts ICM would run the plant. If approved by the Newton City Commission, construction on the plant would begin this summer…
  • International Harvester and Case enthusiasts can buy a new "coffee table" book, covering nearly 200 years of history…
  • "Anyone interested in the evolution of farming will enjoy this book," says Krista Knigge, Case IH director of brand communications. "The history of Case IH dates back to the early 1800s, when Cyrus McCormick's reaper and Jerome Increase Case's threshing machines helped increase agricultural productivity a hundred times over."
  • The book, titled "For Those Who Demand More: We Are Case IH," is available for $35 at your local Case dealer, or on the Internet at www.caseih.com/na and by clicking on "merchandise."
  • The Wichita Eagle reported a week ago that the rugged, reclaimed strip pits in southeast Kansas are fetching more than $3,000 per acre. Hunters and fishermen are eager to buy the property for sporting use…
  • It seems that sportsmen in other states believe the Kansas land – well-known throughout the nation for its big bucks – is a bargain…
  • John Wildin, a Hutchinson-based real estate agent specializing in large rural properties, agreed that even with today's relatively high-demand prices, Kansas rural properties are a bargain and good investment for many out-of-state buyers, the Eagle article says…
TAGS: Wheat
Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish