The Buzz

Lights go out across the state after big ice storm.

Like much of Kansas, the world headquarters of Kansas Farmer was all but shut down earlier this week when ice storms swept through the state. Fortunately for us, we lost electricity for only about 12 hours. Many neighbors and friends across the state will have been without power for more than a week…

  • Growing up on a farm in Jewell County, my siblings and I enjoyed power outages – it was a time to light some candles and play board games. How times change. I felt lost without Internet and e-mail (which was down for two days)…
  • Granted, I had it better than most Kansans, 100,000 of whom were still without power late last week…
  • Throughout the state, between one-half and two-inches of ice fell, causing trees to break off, power lines to break and ultimately, was responsible for the deaths of 11 Kansans. As of Wednesday of last week, more than 130,000 Kansans were without power…
  • There is an interesting brief in the Dec. 1 The Economist magazine, referring to the efforts by Kansas and Missouri to make the "Animal Health Corridor" – a region stretching from Columbia, Missouri to Manhattan the "Silicon Valley" of the animal health industry…
  • The Economist refers to a study by Ron Brakke, an animal health consultant, which reports that more than 45% of the country's fed cattle and 40% of its hogs are found within 350 miles of Kansas City…
  • The region houses more than 120 companies serving the animal health and nutrition industries, including four of the 10 largest international manufacturers of animal health products. Capitalizing on this "brand" will help the region lure more economic development in animal- and bio-sciences, and has thus far resulted in a $300,000 donation from the president of Bayer Animal Health; $50,000 grants from the Kansas City Life Sciences Institute for local research and an option to study a master's degree in business administration for animal-health students from the University of Kansas…
  • Minnesota Representative Collin Peterson last week advocated a three-month extension of the 2002 Farm Bill, due to the Senate's inability to come to an agreement on a new version. The House Ag Committee's ranking Republican, Bob Goodlatte, would like to approve a one-year Extension…
  • In a statement released to the press last week, Goodlatte says, "…I have voiced support for a one-year extension of the current farm bill. A one-year extension would be a temporary fix, but it would offer producers some degree of certainty, at least through the 2008 crop year. We have the opportunity and an obligation to do something to remedy this situation until a farm bill can be worked out and we should act quickly to do so."
TAGS: Farm Policy
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